Direct inhibition of tombusvirus plus-strand RNA synthesis by a dominant negative mutant of a host metabolic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in yeast and plants

Tyng Shyan Huang, Peter D. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

The replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on many cellular factors. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an abundant metabolic enzyme that is recruited to the replicase complex of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and affects asymmetric viral RNA synthesis. To further our understanding on the role of GAPDH in TBSV replication, we used an in vitro TBSV replication assay based on recombinant p33 and p92 pol viral replication proteins and cell-free yeast extract. We found that the addition of purified recombinant GAPDH to the cell extract prepared from GAPDH-depleted yeast results in increased plus-strand RNA synthesis and asymmetric production of viral RNAs. Our data also demonstrate that GAPDH interacts with p92 pol viral replication protein, which may facilitate the recruitment of GAPDH into the viral replicase complex in the yeast model host. In addition, we have identified a dominant negative mutant of GAPDH, which inhibits RNA synthesis and RNA recruitment in vitro. Moreover, this mutant also exhibits strong suppression of tombusvirus accumulation in yeast and in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana. Overall, the obtained data support the model that the co-opted GAPDH plays a direct role in TBSV replication by stimulating plus-strand synthesis by the viral replicase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9090-9102
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume85
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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