Disadvantaged Status and Health Matters Networks among Low-Income African American Women

Erin Pullen, Carrie Oser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A significant gap in current network research relates to understanding the factors that shape the health matters (HM) networks of marginalized, socially disadvantaged populations. This is noteworthy, given that these networks represent a critical resource for mitigating the adverse health effects of both acute and chronic strains associated with marginalized status. Further, research has suggested that the networks of such populations—especially low-income African American women—are unique, and may operate in substantively different ways than those of other groups. Using two waves of data from a sample of low-income African American women, this research identifies the demographic, health status, and health behavior measures at time one that correspond to HM network characteristics at time two, six months later. This study offers preliminary insights on the relationship between key sociodemographic and health status characteristics of low-income African American women and their HM networks, including criminal justice involvement. Findings reveal that though poorer health status and criminal justice involvement correspond to smaller health matters networks, they also correspond to more active and supportive networks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108
JournalSocial Sciences
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01-DA22967; PI: C. Oser). Additionally, this work would not have been possible without the cooperation of the Kentucky Department of Corrections; however, our findings are our own and do not necessarily represent their views. We also acknowledge the participants who openly shared their experiences and the tireless work of interviewers. Finally, we greatly appreciate the feedback of peer reviewers and colleagues who provided comments on earlier versions of this manuscript. A special note of thanks to the first author’s dissertation committee members (including the second author): Brea Perry, Claire Renzetti, and Carl Leukefeld.

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments: This research was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01-DA22967; PI: C. Oser). Additionally, this work would not have been possible without the cooperation of the Kentucky Department of Corrections; however, our findings are our own and do not necessarily represent their views. We also acknowledge the participants who openly shared their experiences and the tireless work of interviewers. Finally, we greatly appreciate the feedback of peer reviewers and colleagues who provided comments on earlier versions of this manuscript. A special note of thanks to the first author’s dissertation committee members (including the second author): Brea Perry, Claire Renzetti, and Carl Leukefeld.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Criminal justice status
  • Egocentric networks
  • Health matters networks
  • Mental health
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Disadvantaged Status and Health Matters Networks among Low-Income African American Women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this