Disease-specific survival of type I and type II epithelial ovarian cancers—stage challenges categorical assignments of indolence & aggressiveness

Edward J. Pavlik, Christopher Smith, Taylor S. Dennis, Elizabeth Harvey, Bin Huang, Quan Chen, Dava West Piecoro, Brian T. Burgess, Anthony McDowell, Justin Gorski, Lauren A. Baldwin, Rachel W. Miller, Christopher P. DeSimone, Charles Dietrich, Holly H. Gallion, Frederick R. Ueland, John R. van Nagell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) consist of several sub-types based on histology, clinical, molecular and epidemiological features that are termed “histo-types”, which can be categorized into less aggressive Type I and more aggressive Type II malignancies. This investigation evaluated the disease-specific survival (DSS) of women with Type I and II EOC using histo-type, grade, and stage. A total of 47,789 EOC cases were identified in the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. Survival analysis and log rank test were performed to identify a 2-tiered classification (grade 1 vs. grade 2 & 3) for serous EOC. DSS of early stage serous EOC for grade 2 was significantly different from grade 3 indicating that a 2-tier classification for serous EOC applied only to late stage. DSS of Type I EOC was much better than Type II. However, DSS was 33–52% lower with late stage Type I than with early stage Type I indicating that Type I ovarian cancers should not be considered indolent. Early stage Type II EOC had much better DSS than late stage Type II stressing that stage has a large role in survival of both Type I and II EOC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number56
JournalDiagnostics
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the authors.

Keywords

  • Epithelial ovarian cancer
  • Grade
  • Histo-types
  • Stage
  • Survival
  • Type I & Type II

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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