Disjunction between canola distribution and the genetic structure of its recently described pest, the canola flower midge (Contarinia brassicola)

Erin O. Campbell, Julian R. Dupuis, Jennifer Holowachuk, Shane Hladun, Meghan A. Vankosky, Boyd A. Mori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Population genomics is a useful tool to support integrated pest management as it can elucidate population dynamics, demography, and histories of invasion. Here, we use a restriction site-associated DNA sequencing approach combined with whole-genome amplification (WGA) to assess genomic population structure of a newly described pest of canola, the diminutive canola flower midge, Contarinia brassicola. Clustering analyses recovered little geographic structure across the main canola production region but differentiated several geographically disparate populations at edges of the agricultural zone. Given a lack of alternative hypotheses for this pattern, we suggest these data support alternative hosts for this species and thus our canola-centric view of this midge as a pest has limited our understanding of its biology. These results speak to the need for increased surveying efforts across multiple habitats and other potential hosts within Brassicaceae to improve both our ecological and evolutionary knowledge of this species and contribute to effective management strategies. We additionally found that use of WGA prior to library preparation was an effective method for increasing DNA quantity of these small insects prior to restriction site-associated DNA sequencing and had no discernible impact on genotyping consistency for population genetic analysis; WGA is therefore likely to be tractable for other similar studies that seek to randomly sample markers across the genome in small organisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13284-13296
Number of pages13
JournalEcology and Evolution
Volume10
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank members of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canola Council of Canada, and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, in particular Scott Meers and Shelley Barkley, for their help in collecting larval samples. We thank two anonymous reviewers for comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. This study contains information licensed under version 2.0 of the Open Government License—Canada. We also wish to recognize computational support provided by WestGrid (www.westgrid.ca) and Compute Canada (www.computecanada.ca). Research funding was provided by the Alberta Canola Producers Commission (Alberta Canola) and the Saskatchewan Canola Development Commission (SaskCanola) as part of the Canola Agronomic Research Program (CARP Grant 2017.12) to MAV and BAM, and the University of Alberta to BAM. The research was further supported by an NSERC-Industrial Research Chair (Grant 545088) to BAM with the Alberta Wheat Commission, Alberta Pulse Growers Commission, Alberta Barley Commission, and Alberta Canola as the industrial sponsors.

Funding Information:
We would like to thank members of Agriculture and Agri‐Food Canada, Canola Council of Canada, and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, in particular Scott Meers and Shelley Barkley, for their help in collecting larval samples. We thank two anonymous reviewers for comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. This study contains information licensed under version 2.0 of the Open Government License—Canada. We also wish to recognize computational support provided by WestGrid ( www.westgrid.ca ) and Compute Canada ( www.computecanada.ca ). Research funding was provided by the Alberta Canola Producers Commission (Alberta Canola) and the Saskatchewan Canola Development Commission (SaskCanola) as part of the Canola Agronomic Research Program (CARP Grant 2017.12) to MAV and BAM, and the University of Alberta to BAM. The research was further supported by an NSERC‐Industrial Research Chair (Grant 545088) to BAM with the Alberta Wheat Commission, Alberta Pulse Growers Commission, Alberta Barley Commission, and Alberta Canola as the industrial sponsors.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • Cecidomyiidae
  • Diptera
  • agriculture
  • integrated pest management
  • population genomics
  • single nucleotide polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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