Do high rates of cigarette consumption increase delay discounting? A cross-sectional comparison of adolescent smokers and young-adult smokers and nonsmokers

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Abstract

The present report attempts to help clarify the causal or consequent relation between frequently reported high rates of delay discounting (DD) associated with cigarette-smoking status in adults. Delay-discount functions of adolescent smokers and young-adult smokers and nonsmokers from two earlier studies [Reynolds, B., Karraker, K., Horn, K., Richards, J.B., 2003. Delay and probability discounting as related to different stages of adolescent smoking and non-smoking. Behav. Process. 64, 333-344; Reynolds, B., Richards, J.B., Horn, K., Karraker, K., 2004. Delay discounting and probability discounting as related to cigarette smoking status in adults. Behav. Process. 65, 35-42] were cross-sectionally compared. If a high rate of DD is a predisposing factor to future smoking status, adolescent and young-adult smokers were expected to have similar rates of DD, but both groups were expected to have higher rates of discounting than young-adult nonsmokers. Alternatively, if a high rate of cigarette consumption over an extended period is related to increases in DD, young-adult smokers were expected to discount more than adolescent smokers and young-adult nonsmokers. Results supported the hypothesis that a high rate of cigarette consumption is related to higher rates of DD, rather than the alternative hypothesis that smokers are predisposed with higher rates of DD. Also, after combining adolescent and young-adult smokers, self-reported number of cigarettes consumed per day was positively correlated with rate of DD; however, reported length of smoking history was not correlated with DD. Possible neurological mechanisms leading to increased discounting are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)545-549
Number of pages5
JournalBehavioural Processes
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2004

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2012 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Delay discounting
  • Human
  • Impulsivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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