Dopamine does not enhance furosemide-induced natriuresis in patients with congestive heart failure

Dennis L. Vargo, D. Craig Brater, David W. Rudy, Suzanne K. Swan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of low-dose (renal-dose) dopamine to furosemide therapy enhances natriuresis in patients with compensated congestive heart failure, New York Head Association Class II or III. We performed a randomized, controlled, open-label, crossover study wherein urinary sodium, creatinine, and furosemide excretion rates and GFR determined by inulin clearance rates were measured during each of three treatment interventions: furosemide infusion alone, dopamine infusion alone, and furosemide and dopamine infusions administered concurrently. Six of eight recruited subjects (4 male, 2 female) were able to complete the study. The baseline sodium excretion rate after equilibration on a metabolic diet was 6.7 ± 0.7 mEq (mean ± SE) over 3 h. Infusion of dopamine alone caused a slight nonsignificant increase in natriuresis to 36.7 ± 8.5 mEq/3 h. Furosemide alone markedly increased sodium excretion to 276.6 ± 47.2 mEq/3 h. No significant additional increment in natriuresis occurred when dopamine and furosemide were administered concurrently (253.8 ± 73.6 mEq/3 h). Neither dopamine, furosemide, or their coadministration affected GFR. In conclusion, infusion of low-dose dopamine does not enhance furosemide- induced urinary sodium excretion rates in patients with compensated congestive heart failure, New York Heart Association Class II or III.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1032-1037
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume7
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1996

Keywords

  • Diuretic combinations
  • Edema
  • GFR
  • Oop diuretics
  • Pharmacodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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