Effect of an in-clinic IPV advocate intervention to increase help seeking, reduce violence, and improve well-being

Ann L. Coker, Paige H. Smith, Daniel J. Whitaker, Brenda Le, Timothy N. Crawford, Vicki C. Flerx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

This quasi-experimental study investigated the efficacy of clinic-based advocacy for intimate partner violence (IPV) to increase help seeking, reduce violence, and improve women's well-being. Eligible and consenting women attending one of six selected clinics in the rural Southern United States were assessed for IPV. Consenting women disclosing IPV were offered either an in-clinic advocate intervention or usual care, depending on the clinic they attended and were followed for up to 24 months. Over follow-up time both IPV scores and depressive symptoms trended toward greater decline among women in the advocate intervention clinics relative to the usual care (business card referral only).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-131
Number of pages14
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by a cooperative agreement with CDC #US4CCU419014.

Keywords

  • abuse
  • depression
  • evaluation
  • health care
  • intervention
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of an in-clinic IPV advocate intervention to increase help seeking, reduce violence, and improve well-being'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this