Effect of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for parents of high- risk neonates on perceived anxiety, control, and burden

Debra K. Moser, Kathleen Dracup, Lynn V. Doering

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35 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Study objectives: (1) To compare the effects of 3 methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training for parents of infants at risk for cardiac or respiratory arrest on anxiety, perception of control, and sense of burden; and (2) to identify parents' attitudes about CPR training and willingness to perform CPR if needed. METHODS: A longitudinal, controlled trial was conducted with parents and other caretakers of high-risk infants. Subjects were recruited from 5 level III neonatal intensive care units. We enrolled each of 578 subjects in 1 of 4 groups: (1) CPR-Video; (2) CPR- Didactic; (3) CPR-Social Support; or (4) control (no CPR training). Of these, 335 completed the entire study. Data were collected at baseline, and 2 weeks and 6 months after CPR training. The main outcomes measured were perceived anxiety, control, and burden related to caring for a high-risk infant and attitudes about responding to an emergency. RESULTS: Subjects reported moderately high anxiety, sense of burden, and feelings of loss of control before CPR training. Within groups, subjects in all 3 treatment groups reported improvement in perceptions of anxiety, control, and burden 2 weeks after CPR training, with continued improvement evident 6 months after CPR training (P = .001). In contrast, perceptions were unchanged in the control group. Among groups, at 2 weeks there were significant differences in means between control and CPR-Didactic groups (P = .01), and at 6 months there were significant differences in means between control and CPR-Didactic groups (P = .01) and between control and CPR-Social Support groups (P = .01). CONCLUSION: CPR training is an important intervention for promoting a sense of control and reducing the anxiety and sense of burden experienced by parents of neonates at risk for cardiopulmonary arrest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326-333
Number of pages8
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Nursing Research, grant RO1 NR02434.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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