Effect of lifestyle-based lipid lowering interventions on the relationship between circulating levels of per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances and serum cholesterol

Stephanie Morgan, M. Abdul Mottaleb, Maria P. Kraemer, Debra K. Moser, Jessica Worley, Andrew J. Morris, Michael C. Petriello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exposure to certain per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) has been shown to be positively associated with total and/or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Examining this association in lipid lowering interventions may provide additional evidence linking PFAS to cardiovascular risk. We examined the relationship of 6 PFAS with cholesterol in a 6-month lifestyle-based intervention. We quantitated PFAS in 350 individuals at baseline and post intervention and examined associations of PFAS with cholesterol before and after intervention. Food frequency questionnaires and GIS analyses were used to investigate PFAS hotspots and possible exposure routes. Cholesterol significantly decreased following intervention and in parallel, PFOS, PFOA, PFHxS, and PFHpA significantly decreased. PFOS was positively correlated with total cholesterol only post-intervention. We observed that PFOS was distributed among both non-albumin and albumin lipoprotein fractions pre-intervention, but entirely in albumin fraction post-intervention. Our results indicate that lipid-lowering via lifestyle modification may impact on circulating levels or distribution of PFAS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104062
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Pharmacology
Volume98
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cholesterol
  • PFAS
  • PFOS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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