Effectiveness of a Bystander Intervention Program to Increase Bystander Behaviors Across Latent Risk Groups of High Schoolers

Annelise Mennicke, Heather M. Bush, Candace J. Brancato, Gabrielle Haley, Erin Meehan, Ann L. Coker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bystander intervention programs have established efficacy to increase bystander behaviors to prevent interpersonal violence (IPV). Little research has investigated intervention efficacy among latent risk classes among high school students. Data from a five-year randomized control trial were used to conduct multigroup path analyses to assess the association between type of training received and bystander outcomes moderated by risk groups identified via latent profile analysis (LPA). LPA was used to identify risk based on six indicators related to violence exposure, association with aggressive friends, and alcohol use. Bystander training received was the primary independent variable characterized as: no training, overview speech alone, or skills training. Outcomes included (a) observed bystander behaviors; (b) reactive bystander behaviors; or (c) proactive bystander behaviors. Three risk groups were identified via LPA: low risk, moderate risk witnesses of IPV, and highest risk victims and perpetrators. Of the bystander trainings received, overview speeches only increased reactive bystander behaviors among low risk students. The skills training was effective at increasing most bystander outcomes among all risk groups, with the largest effect sizes observed among the highest risk victims and perpetrators profile. Findings suggest that tailoring or modifying bystander training based on the risk profiles of youth may lead to greater potential to increase bystander behaviors to reduce risk of violence. Specifically, overview speech trainings should be targeted to low risk youth, while skills training primarily delivered to higher risk youth. These skills trainings could incorporate content related to trauma-informed care as well as associations with alcohol use, which may enhance their effectiveness further.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-86
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume39
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research and/or authorship of this article: The parent study was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cooperative Agreement 5U01CE001675. Support for the secondary data analysis research was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Award 1K01CE003158-01-00. The findings and opinions expressed in this paper do not necessarily reflect the views of the CDC.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023.

Keywords

  • alcohol and drugs
  • prevention
  • sexual assault
  • violence
  • youth violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effectiveness of a Bystander Intervention Program to Increase Bystander Behaviors Across Latent Risk Groups of High Schoolers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this