Effects of dehydroabietic acid on the physical state of cytoskeletal proteins and the lipid bilayer of erythrocyte membranes

D. Allan Butterfield, Chafia H. Trad, Nathan C. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a major aquatic toxic resin acid usually found in unbleached pulp mill effluents. This compound has been reported to accumulate in the red cells of rainbow trout and to cause hemolysis. To elucidate further understanding to the mechanism of action of this resin, the interaction of DHAA with human erythrocyte membranes has been monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques of spin labeling. Results presented in this paper indicate that DHAA, in a concentration-dependent manner, significantly altered both the motion and order of the lipid bilayer and the physical state of cytoskeletal proteins, while DHAA had no effect on isolated lipids. It is proposed that the increase in the 'fluidity' of the lipid bilayer induced by DHAA is a secondary effect of primary changes in the physical state of the cytoskeletal proteins of the membrane, and that the latter effect is critically associated with the toxicity of DHAA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-189
Number of pages5
JournalBBA - Biomembranes
Volume1192
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 22 1994

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by grants from NSF (EHR-9108764) and NIH (AG-10836) to D.A.B.C.H.T. was supported by the BOBST Travel Grant from the American University of Beirut.

Keywords

  • (Pulp and paper mill)
  • (Trout)
  • Aquatic contamination
  • Dehydroabietic acid
  • EPR
  • Erythrocyte
  • Hemolysis
  • Resin acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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