Effects of image congruency on persuasiveness and recall in direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising

Kristen Kiernicki, Donald W. Helme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, content analyses suggest advertisers may not disclose drug risks in the same way they describe drug benefits. This study tests the relationship between image congruency in televised DTC advertisements, recall of risks/benefits, and perceived persuasiveness. Advertisements for Nasonex, Advair, and Lunesta were shown to college students in either their original (image incongruent) or modified (image neutral) form. Risks were easier to recall with image-neutral advertisements. Gender also had a significant interaction effect, suggesting that males and females process DTC advertisement differently.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-301
Number of pages18
JournalHealth Marketing Quarterly
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Direct-to-consumer advertising
  • drug risks
  • elaboration likelihood model
  • fair balance
  • image congruency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (all)
  • Marketing

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