Effects of including Sweet Bran or modified distillers grains in the diet of feedlot steers and sorting at terminal implant on growth performance, feeding behavior, and liver abscess occurrence

Katie J. Heiderscheit, Aubree M. Beenken, Erin L. Deters, Katherine G. Hochmuth, Trey D. Jackson, Elizabeth M. Messersmith, Allison J. Vanderwal, Katherine R. Vanvalin, Joshua M. Peschel, Stephanie L. Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objectives were to assess the effects of dietary Sweet Bran (Cargill Corn Milling, Blair, NE) on performance and feeding behavior of feedlot steers and determine if terminal implant pen sorting affects performance, feeding behavior, and liver abscess (LA) rate. Two hundred sixteen Angus-cross steers (253 ± 18 kg) were stratified by body weight (BW) to 36 pens. From d 0 to 60, diets contained 40% Sweet Bran (SWBR) or 25% modified distiller's grains and 15% dry rolled corn (MOD; n = 18 pens/treatment). On d 60, steers began transition within treatments to finishing diets containing 25% Sweet Bran or 25% modified distiller's grains (MDGS). On d 111, half of the pens for each dietary treatment were re-stratified by BW to pens (SORT) while the other half were returned to original pens (NOSORT; n = 9 pens/treatment). Steer BW and pen dry matter intake (DMI) were recorded monthly. Rate of feed disappearance was determined on d 5/6, 53/54, 104/105, and 117/118. Pen was the experimental unit for all analyses. The model included the fixed effect of diet for all pre-sort analyses; post-sort analyses included the fixed effects of diet, sort, and the interaction and the random effects of pen and the interaction of diet and pen. On d 60, SWBR had greater BW than MOD (P = 0.05), and SWBR had a greater average daily gain (ADG) from d 0 to 60 (P = 0.05). Though there were no differences after d 28, SWBR had greater DMI d 0 to 28 (P = 0.05). From d 60 to 88, SWBR tended to have lesser ADG than MOD (P = 0.09). Post-sort (d 111 to 196), SWBR tended to have lesser ADG than MOD (P = 0.06), and SORT had a greater rate of feed disappearance than NOSORT (d 117/118; P = 0.01); there were no differences on other dates (Diet: P ≥ 0.38). For final BW, there was a tendency for MOD to be greater than SWBR, and SORT tended to be greater than NOSORT (Diet: P = 0.06; Sort: P = 0.10). Pre- and post-sort ruminal pH had no treatment by day differences (P ≥ 0.77). LA incidence averaged 25%, though rate was not affected by diet, sorting, or the interaction (P ≥ 0.16). Overall, there were no dietary differences in feed disappearance rates, though SORT steers had greater rate of feed disappearance than NOSORT steers on d 117/118. Nominal differences in feeding behavior were noted and including Sweet Bran in the diet was beneficial in the growing period as cattle adjusted to the feedlot.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbertxac112
JournalTranslational Animal Science
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments We would like to thank Cargill, Inc. (Blair, NE, USA) for partial funding of this project. We would also like to acknowledge the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Research farm crew and the staff of Upper Iowa Beef for their efforts in maintaining research endeavors during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society of Animal Science.

Keywords

  • cattle
  • feeding behavior
  • feedlot
  • liver abscess
  • regrouping
  • Sweet Bran

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Veterinary (all)

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