Effects of level and source of carbohydrate and level of degradable intake protein on intake and digestion of low-quality tallgrass-prairie hay by beef steers

J. S. Heldt, R. C. Cochran, C. P. Mathis, B. C. Woods, K. C. Olson, E. C. Titgemeyer, T. G. Nagaraja, E. S. Vanzant, D. E. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ruminally fistulated steers (n = 13; 263 kg) were used in an incomplete Latin square with 13 treatments and four periods to evaluate the effects of level and source of supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) and level of degradable intake protein (DIP) on the utilization of low-quality, tallgrass-prairie hay. Steers were given ad libitum access to forage (5.7% CP, 2.6% DIP, and 74.9% NDF). The supplementation treatments were fashioned as a 2 x 3 x 2 factorial arrangement plus a negative control (NC; no supplement). The factors included two DIP levels (.031 and .122% BW) and three CHO sources (starch, glucose, and fiber) fed at two levels (.15 and .30% BW) within each level of DIP supplementation. The effect of supplementation on forage OM intake (FOMI) was dependent (P < .01) on level and source of CHO and level of DIP fed. When DIP was low, forage, total, and digestible OM intakes were generally greater for the starch treatment than for the nonstarch treatments. However, when the DIP level was high, intakes were greater for the nonstarch (i.e., fiber and glucose) treatments. Generally, FOMI decreased (P < .01) when more supplemental CHO was provided. Supplementation typically increased fiber digestion, but the response was dependent (P < .01) on level and source of CHO and level of DIP. Generally, supplements with low levels of CHO improved NDF digestion (NDFD). However, supplements with the high level of CHO decreased NDFD, except for fiber at the high level of DIP. Organic matter digestion was increased by supplementation, but the impact of increasing CHO was dependent (P < .01) on source of CHO and level of DIP. Supplementation treatments had significant impact on ruminal pH, NH3 N, and the total concentration of organic acids as well as their relative proportions. In conclusion, supplemental DIP enhanced the use of low-quality forage; however, the impact of supplemental CHO on low-quality forage use was dependent on source and level of CHO offered, as well as the level of DIP provided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2846-2854
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume77
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999

Keywords

  • Carbohydrates
  • Digestibility
  • Forage
  • Intake
  • Protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of level and source of carbohydrate and level of degradable intake protein on intake and digestion of low-quality tallgrass-prairie hay by beef steers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this