Effects of oral glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced gastrointestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression

Micah N. Zuhl, Kathryn R. Lanphere, Len Kravitz, Christine M. Mermier, Suzanne Schneider, Karol Dokladny, Pope L. Moseley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objectives of this study are threefold: 1) to assess whether 7 days of oral glutamine (GLN) supplementation reduces exercise-induced intestinal permeability; 2) whether supplementation prevents the proinflammatory response; and 3) whether these changes are associated with upregulation of the heat shock response. On separate occasions, eight human subjects participated in baseline testing and in GLN and placebo (PLA) supplementation trials, followed by a 60-min treadmill run. Intestinal permeability was higher in the PLA trial compared with baseline and GLN trials (0.0604 ± 0.047 vs. 0.0218 ± 0.008 and 0.0272 ± 0.007, respectively; P < 0.05). IκBα; expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher 240 min after exercise in the GLN trial compared with the PLA trial (1.411 ± 0.523 vs. 0.9839 ± 0.343, respectively; P < 0.05). In vitro using the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2, we measured effects of GLN supplementation (0, 4, and 6 mM) on heat-induced (37° or 41.8°C) heat shock protein 70(HSP70), heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), and occludin expression. HSF-1 and HSP70 levels increased in 6 mM supplementation at 41°C compared with0mM at41°C (1.785 ± 0.495 vs. 0.6681 ± 0.290, and 1.973 ± 0.325 vs. 1.133 ± 0.129, respectively; P < 0.05). Occludin levels increased after 4 mM supplementation at 41°C and 6 mM at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.236 ± 0.219 and 1.849 ± 0.564 vs. 0.7434 ± 0.027, respectively; P < 0.001). GLN supplementation prevented exercise-induced permeability, possibly through HSF-1 activation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume116
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2014

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Permeability
  • Tight junction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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