Eliciting willingness to pay without bias using follow-up certainty statements: Comparisons between probably/definitely and a 10-point certainty Scale

Glenn C. Blomquist, Karen Blumenschein, Magnus Johannesson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Correction for hypothetical bias using follow up certainty questions often takes one of two forms: (1) two options, "definitely sure" and "probably sure", or (2) a 10-point scale with 10 very certain. While both have been successful in eliminating hypothetical bias from estimates of WTP by calibrating based on the certainty of yes responses, little is known about the relationship between the two. The purpose of this paper is to compare the two using data from three field experiments in a private good, dichotomous choice format. We compare four types of yes responses that differ in the criterion used to determine if there is sufficient certainty for a hypothetical yes response to be considered a true yes response. We make several comparisons, but focus on determining which values on the 10-point scale give the same estimates of WTP as "definitely sure" hypothetical yeses and real yeses (actual purchases). Values that produce equivalence are near 10 on the certainty scale.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-502
Number of pages30
JournalEnvironmental and Resource Economics
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Certainty statements
  • Contingent valuation
  • Field experiments
  • Hypothetical bias
  • Willingness to pay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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