Emergency Nurses’ Perceptions of Efficiency and Design: Examining ED Structure, Process, and Outcomes

Lindsey Fay, Allison Carll-White, Kevin Real

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Due to increasing demands, it is imperative for emergency departments to improve efficiency, while providing safe and effective care. Efficient and quality healthcare delivery are impacted by interactions among the emergency department's physical structure, processes, and outcomes. Examining the interrelationship between these three components is essential for assessing quality of care in the ED setting. Studies simultaneously investigating all three aspects of this model are rare. Objectives: To study examined emergency nurses’ perceptions of efficiency and satisfaction with the design of a newly constructed academic emergency department through analysis of these three assessment factors. Methods: Data were collected using observational techniques, physical measurements of walking, and staff questionnaires. Correlation analysis was employed to investigate the relationships among specific structure, process, and outcome factors. Hierarchical linear regression was conducted to understand which structure and process variables in particular were related to the dependent variable, perceptions of efficiency and staff satisfaction with design. Results: Outcomes revealed that all of the structure and process factors examined in this emergency department including unit configuration, technology, lighting, visibility, patient room layout, storage, walkability, staff stress, data access, and teamwork were significantly associated with perceptions of efficiency and staff satisfaction with design. Discussion: The findings suggest that the structure of the built environment can shape healthcare processes occurring within it and ultimately improve the delivery of efficient care, thus increasing both patient and staff satisfaction. As such, the designed environment has a critical impact on enhancing performance, productivity, and staff satisfaction. Image 1: Contribution to Emergency Nursing Practice • There are few studies that simultaneously investigate the interactions among the physical structure, processes, and outcomes of emergency departments. Simultaneously investigating all 3 aspects of this model can offer insights into emergency nurses’ perceptions of efficiency and satisfaction with design.• In this study, all the structure and process factors including unit configuration, technology, lighting, visibility, patient room layout, storage, walkability, staff stress, data access, and teamwork were significantly associated with perceptions of efficiency and staff satisfaction with design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-279
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Emergency Nursing
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Emergency Nurses Association

Keywords

  • Design
  • Efficiency
  • Emergency Department
  • Satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency

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