Emotional ability and associative learning: How experiencing and reasoning about emotions impacts evaluative conditioning

Jonathan Hasford, Blair Kidwell, David M. Hardesty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We extend evaluative conditioning research by examining how differences in emotional ability impact implicit and explicit attitude formation from conditioning. Across five studies, the ability to experience emotional information enhanced the valence of implicit attitudes toward a conditioned stimulus (CS). Conversely, the ability to reason about emotional information reduced the impact of implicit CS attitudes on subsequent explicit evaluations. Furthermore, we examine how brand familiarity and the timing of conditioned and unconditioned stimulus pairings impacts attitude formation. Implications for associative learning and persuasion are provided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)743-760
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Attitude formation
  • Emotional ability
  • Evaluative conditioning
  • Implicit attitudes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

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