Evaluation of a technology-enhanced intervention for older women with HIV infection: a proof of concept study

Veronica P.S. Njie-Carr, Shijun Zhu, Geoffrey C. Williams, Inge B. Corless, Seth Himelhoch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The syndemic effects of HIV infection, side effects of highly active antiretroviral medications, and age-related changes lead to increased risk for comorbidities and functional decline for older people with HIV. This proof of concept (PoC) study evaluated perceived usefulness, satisfaction, acceptability, intervention processes, resource management, and outcome effect variances of ThE CARE Intervention guided by the Self-Determination Theory. To test the utility of ThE CARE, we conducted a one-group pre/posttest intervention design with a convenience sample of 20 women, 50 years and older. The mean age was 56 years (SD = 11) and years since HIV diagnosis was 23.7 (SD = 8.6). ThE CARE intervention was found useful and participants “felt empowered” utilizing the app. Fourteen participants (70%) reported high-intensity distress and negative impact on life from neuropathic pain, anxiety (55%), fatigue (50%), and depressive symptoms (35%). Self-awareness and self-regulation also improved. Modest results of acceptability, usability, and positive trends in the outcome measures suggest possible effects. The interactivity and cultural relevance of ThE CARE would enhance women’s autonomous motivation and perceived competence to actively engage in self-care. The PoC study provides important foundational information to advance science in mHealth interventions for older women with HIV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-992
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We acknowledge funding support from the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) Dean’s Research Scholar’s Program (PI: Njie-Carr, 2016–2018) and the University of Maryland, Baltimore, ICTR and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) grant number 1UL1TR003098-01.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Community-informed
  • ORBIT model
  • mHealth application
  • self-determination theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluation of a technology-enhanced intervention for older women with HIV infection: a proof of concept study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this