Evaluation of the effects of inhibition of monoamine oxidase and senescence on methamphetamine-induced neuronal damage

George C. Wagner, Sharon L. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The administration of high doses of methamphetamine causes long lasting damage to central dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons through a mechanism known to involve presynaptic, cytoplasmic stores of those transmitters and thought to be dependent upon a free radical reaction. The following studies were designed to determine if differential inhibition of the subtypes of monoamine oxidase would alter the magnitude of the methamphetamine induced neuronal damage. In addition, since monoamine oxidase type B increases with age, the effects of high dose administration of methamphetamine were evaluated in sensescent mice. It was observed that inhibition of monoamine oxidase type A, and to a lesser degree, type B, increased the magnitude of methamphetamine-induced neuronal damage and that aged mice were more sensitive to the toxic action of methamphetamine. These results are interpreted with respect to the use of monoamine oxidase inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-174
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Keywords

  • deprenyl
  • methamphetamine
  • monoamine oxidase
  • senescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology

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