Evaluation of the Green Dot Bystander Intervention to Reduce Interpersonal Violence Among College Students Across Three Campuses

Ann L. Coker, Bonnie S. Fisher, Heather M. Bush, Suzanne C. Swan, Corrine M. Williams, Emily R. Clear, Sarah DeGue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

222 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evidence suggests that interventions to engage bystanders in violence prevention increase bystander intentions and efficacy to intervene, yet the impact of such programs on violence remains unknown. This study compared rates of violence by type among undergraduate students attending a college campus with the Green Dot bystander intervention (n = 2,768) with students at two colleges without bystander programs (n = 4,258). Violent victimization rates were significantly (p 003C;.01) lower among students attending the campus with Green Dot relative to the two comparison campuses. Violence perpetration rates were lower among males attending the intervention campus. Implications of these results for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1507-1527
Number of pages21
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014, © The Author(s) 2014.

Keywords

  • bystander intervention
  • college students
  • dating violence
  • prevention
  • sexual harassment
  • sexual violence
  • stalking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluation of the Green Dot Bystander Intervention to Reduce Interpersonal Violence Among College Students Across Three Campuses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this