Exhausted, Stressed, and Disengaged: Does Employment Create Burnout for Social Work Students?

Kalea Benner, Angela L. Curl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although burnout is a known risk for practitioners, some social work students may experience burnout in the classroom as a result of role conflict from balancing academics with employment. Higher rates of burnout occur in other disciplines in employed students, even higher than in professionals, because of the stress of shifting priorities between workplace and collegiate responsibilities. Employment can decrease collegiate engagement and academic competence and deter persistence to degree, all of which lead to the reduced competency associated with burnout. Additionally, physical and mental health factors are associated with role conflict, leading to a higher risk of burnout for employed students and resulting in burnout for social work students in the classroom even prior to becoming a practitioner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-309
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Social Work Education
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exhausted, Stressed, and Disengaged: Does Employment Create Burnout for Social Work Students?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this