Exploration and Comparison of Contextual Characteristics and Mistreatment Prevalence Among Older American Indian and Alaska Native Respondents: Secondary Analysis of the National Elder Mistreatment Study

Jolie Crowder, Camille Burnett, Ha Do Byon, Kathryn Laughon, Ronald Acierno, Guofen Yan, Ivora Hinton, Pamela B. Teaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Limited research on elder abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) suggests a higher prevalence of abuse. Using data from the National Elder Mistreatment Study (NEMS), we compared contextual characteristics and elder mistreatment prevalence rates from a community-based sample of AIAN (n = 195) and Black (n = 437) and White (n = 5,013) respondents. There were differences in the prevalence of 16 abuse types and the 23 contextual variables. AIAN respondents had more similarities compared with Black respondents than White respondents, though differences existed. The cumulative prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual mistreatment in the past year, neglect, and financial abuse by a family member for the AIAN group was 33%, almost double the 17.1% reported in the NEMS study. Over their lifetime, 29.7% of AIAN respondents reported experiencing two or more types of neglect, exploitation, or mistreatment. Almost one fourth of AIAN respondents reported emotional abuse since 60 years of age (the most commonly occurring abuse type)—nearly double that of White respondents. This is the first study to offer comparative prevalence of elder abuse for both AIAN older males and females that draws from a nationally representative sample. The study also provides descriptive analysis of important contextual information within the AIAN population, an underrepresented racial group in elder abuse research. Disaggregating nonmajority racial groups to examine contextual variables and the prevalence of elder mistreatment in the NEMS data set specific to AIAN respondents fills a knowledge gap. Known prevalence of various abuse typologies among AIAN elders can be useful in setting priorities for community planning and response, and in prioritization of funding for future research on causative mechanisms by abuse type, screening, and interventions at various levels. Findings may facilitate development of culturally specific evidence-based prevention and intervention practices aimed at needs specific to AIAN older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1456-1483
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume37
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2020.

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • National Elder Mistreatment Study
  • Native American
  • elder abuse
  • elder maltreatment
  • elder mistreatment
  • exploitation
  • minority
  • neglect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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