Exploring the relationship between pediatrician self-disclosure and parent satisfaction

Gretchen Norling Holmes, Nancy Grant Harrington, Adam J. Parrish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patient satisfaction is a frequently explored outcome in physician-patient communication research. One variable that may influence patient satisfaction, but that has not been extensively explored, is physician self-disclosure (SD). This study examined the effect of pediatrician SD on parent satisfaction in the context of a "sick child" office visit. Results showed that parents were more satisfied with visits in which pediatricians self-disclosed than with those in which pediatricians did not self-disclose. Implications of the study's results and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-369
Number of pages5
JournalCommunication Research Reports
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Gretchen Norling Holmes (PhD, University of Kentucky, 2003) is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Arts at the University of West Florida. Nancy Grant Harrington (PhD, University of Kentucky, 1992) is a professor and chair in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky. Adam J. Parrish (MA, University of West Florida, 2009) is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky. This research was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Correspondence: Gretchen Norling Holmes, Department of Communication Arts, University of West Florida, 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514; E-mail: gnorling@uwf.edu

Keywords

  • Parent Satisfaction
  • Physician Self-Disclosure
  • Physician-Patient Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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