Family and Cultural Perceptions About Meat Consumption among Hispanic/Latino and White Adults in the United States

Morgan Elizabeth Ellithorpe, Bruno Takahashi, Geri Alumit Zeldes, Elizabeth Dorrance-Hall, Manuel Chavez, Julie Plasencia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study examines the extent to which Hispanic/Latino Americans and non-Hispanic White Americans report that meat is an important aspect of their cultural beliefs and practices. An online national survey was completed using quota sampling to recruit approximately equal groups of U.S. Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic White Americans (n = 512). A path model predicting willingness to reduce meat consumption was estimated. Hispanic/Latino Americans viewed meat as a more integral aspect of their cultural food practices, and reported that meat dishes comprise a higher percentage of their culture’s traditional foods. Cultural beliefs were associated with meat consumption and willingness to reduce meat consumption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-366
Number of pages14
JournalEcology of Food and Nutrition
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
No competitive grants or other support was received.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Diet
  • culture
  • ethnicity
  • family
  • meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Ecology

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