Family Obligation, Parenting, and Adolescent Outcomes Among Mexican American Families

Jinjin Yan, Yang Hou, Yishan Shen, Su Yeong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study investigates how and under what conditions family obligation benefits Mexican American adolescents’ adjustment. The study used two waves of data from 604 Mexican American adolescents (54.3% female, Mage.wave1 = 12.41 years, SD = 0.97) and their parents. Structural equation modeling revealed that both adolescents’ and parents’ sense of family obligation related to more supportive parenting (i.e., parental monitoring, warmth, and inductive reasoning), which linked to better adolescent adjustment (i.e., sense of life meaning, resilience, and grades). There were parent gender differences: Adolescents’ family obligation was more strongly related to their reports of maternal (vs. paternal) parenting. The links also varied across informants for parenting: (a) individuals’ sense of family obligation related only to their own perceptions of parenting and (b) there were more evident associations between adolescent-reported (vs. parent-reported) parenting and adolescent outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-88
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2021.

Keywords

  • Mexican American adolescents
  • adolescent adjustment
  • family obligation
  • parenting practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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