Feeding behavior and activity levels are associated with recovery status in dairy calves treated with antimicrobials for Bovine Respiratory Disease

M. C. Cantor, David L. Renaud, Heather W. Neave, Joao H.C. Costa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Calves with Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) have different feeding behavior and activity levels prior to BRD diagnosis when compared to healthy calves, but it is unknown if calves who relapse from their initial BRD diagnosis are behaviorally different from calves who recover. Using precision technologies, we aimed to identify associations of feeding behavior and activity with recovery status in dairy calves (recovered or relapsed) over the 10 days after first antimicrobial treatment for BRD. Dairy calves were health scored daily for a BRD bout (using a standard respiratory scoring system and lung ultrasonography) and received antimicrobial therapy (enrofloxacin) on day 0 of initial BRD diagnosis; 10–14 days later, recovery status was scored as either recovered or relapsed (n = 19 each). Feeding behaviors and activity were monitored using automated feeders and pedometers. Over the 10 days post-treatment, recovered calves showed improvements in starter intake and were generally more active, while relapsed calves showed sickness behaviors, including depressed feed intake, and longer lying times. These results suggest there is a new potential for precision technology devices on farms in evaluating recovery status of dairy calves that are recently treated for BRD; there is opportunity to automatically identify relapsing calves before re-emergence of clinical disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4854
JournalScientific Reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

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© 2022, The Author(s).

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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