Feeding long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids during gestation increases intestinal glucose absorption potentially via the acute activation of AMPK

Nicholas K. Gabler, J. Scott Radcliffe, Joel D. Spencer, Doug M. Webel, Michael E. Spurlock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study utilized Ussing chambers to examine the impact of supplementing maternal gestation and/or lactation diets with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) provided via a protected fish oil (PFO) product on intestinal fatty acid profiles and ex vivo glucose uptake in the jejunum of weanling piglets. Jejunum tissues were enriched with n-3 PUFA as a result of feeding the sows the PFO during gestation and/or lactation (P<.05). Glucose uptake improved by twofold (P<.042) in intestinal preparations obtained from the offspring of sows fed PFO during gestation or throughout gestation/lactation versus lactation alone. This was also reflected in the jejunum protein expressions of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1). Furthermore, adding docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist to the chamber buffer improved glucose uptake (P<.05) in intestinal preparations obtained from the offspring fed the control diet, devoid of the PFO product and containing minimal concentrations of n-3 PUFA. Collectively, these data indicate two important points. First, long-term exposure to n-3 PUFA via the maternal gestation diet effectively enhances glucose uptake in the weanling piglet, and the underlying mechanism may be associated with changes in the intestinal fatty acid profile. Secondly, there is an apparent direct and acute effect of DHA that is achieved within a time frame that precludes substantial changes in the intestinal fatty acid profile. Additionally, both mechanisms may involve activation of AMPK. Thus, n-3 PUFA delivered in utero and postnatally via the maternal diet may help the offspring adapt quickly to rapidly changing diets early in life and allow optimal nutrient uptake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • AMP-activated protein kinase
  • Glucose transporter 2
  • n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid
  • Pig
  • Small intestine
  • Sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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