First Comes Marriage, Then Comes the Election: Macro-level Event Impacts on African American, Latina/x, and White Sexual Minority Women

Ellen D.B. Riggle, Laurie A. Drabble, Alicia K. Matthews, Cindy B. Veldhuis, Robyn A. Nisi, Tonda L. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Sexual minority women (SMW) may have different experiences of macro-level events, such as changes in marriage laws or election outcomes, related to their multiple identities. African American, Latina/x, and White identities intersect with gender/sex and sexual identity to influence experiences at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, social, and political levels of the socio-ecological environment. Methods: Participants include 100 African American, 35 Latina/x, and 164 White SMW (N = 299) in wave 4 (2017–2019) of a longitudinal study of SMW’s health conducted in the USA (Chicago Health and Life Experiences of Women Study). Responses to nine open-ended survey questions about marriage equality and the 2016 Presidential election were examined. Results: Thematic analysis noted similarities across groups and focused on group differences in four areas: (1) personal well-being (including fear and anxiety about discrimination; risk associated with masculine presentation; and religion as stress and support); (2) interpersonal relationships (including relationships with partners, family, and in a community); (3) societal discrimination and prejudice (including harassment in public spaces and concerns about travel); and (4) civil rights, government harassment, and police-state violence. Conclusions: Emerging differences emphasized the impact of race/ethnicity and the intersection of race/ethnicity and gender on experiences of marriage equality and the 2016 election. Policy Implications: Findings suggest that a more nuanced understanding of the experiences of individuals with different racial/racialized identities and the intersection of race/ethnicity with sexual identities is essential to creating culturally competent and effective supports for SMW.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-126
Number of pages15
JournalSexuality Research and Social Policy
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) of the National Institutes of Health under award number R01AA013328-14 (PI: T. L. Hughes). Dr. Veldhuis' participation in this research was supported by the NIAAA of the National Institutes of Health under the Ruth Kirschstein Postdoctoral Research Fellowship award number F32AA025816 (PI: C. Veldhuis). The content is solely the responsiblity of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIAAA or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • 2016 election
  • Intersectionality
  • Minority stress
  • Same-sex marriage
  • Sexual minority women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'First Comes Marriage, Then Comes the Election: Macro-level Event Impacts on African American, Latina/x, and White Sexual Minority Women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this