For Better or Worse: an Assessment of the ‘Linked Lives’ Concept and the Race-Based Effects of Partner Stress on Self-Rated Health Among Older Adults

Myles D. Moody, Robyn L. Brown, Gabriele Ciciurkaite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of the life course framework concept of “linked lives” for examining the effects of partner stress on self-rated health among older adult populations. Method: Data were derived from a partner-dyad study of Miami-Dade County residents and their significant others. We limited our analysis to respondents ages 60 or older (n = 409). Results: Regression analyses revealed that greater levels of personally experienced major life events were associated with worse self-rated health. However, the association between a significant other’s stress exposure and one’s own self-rated health was only statistically significant among Black respondents. Discussion: Extending prior study indicating that Black Americans tend to have worse self-rated health later in life relative to other racial groups, these findings demonstrate the utility of the linked lives concept for furthering an understanding of racial disparities in health based upon loved ones’ stressful experiences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-867
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of racial and ethnic health disparities
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute.

Keywords

  • Life course
  • Linked lives
  • Older populations
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Self-rated health
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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