Gender differences and predictors of mortality in spontaneous coronary artery dissection: A review of reported cases

Ellen A. Thompson, Sue Ellen Ferraris, Todd Gress, Victor Ferraris

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare clinical event with little available information on etiology, treatment, or outcomes. Two cases of SCAD are presented and identified cases from the literature with complete data (n = 222) are reviewed and analyzed. Female patients (71.9%) were younger (40.4 versus 46.7; p < 0.001), less likely to have coronary artery disease (3.7 versus 20.6%; p = 0.01), more likely to have left anterior descending artery (46.4 versus 25.4%; p = 0.004) and left main artery involvement (14.9 versus 3.2%; p = 0.01), and less likely to survive (50.9 versus 22.2%; p < 0.001) compared to their male counterparts. Thirty percent were in the peripartum state. Multivariate predictors of death included female sex (OR 4.27; 95% CI 1.50 to 12.2), non-treatment (OR 35.5; 95% CI 10.7 to 118.1), and earlier decade of diagnosis (OR 0.28 per increase in decade after 1980; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.49). Survival was no different by treatment type and did improve over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-61
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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