Gender differences in alcohol and drug use among hispanic adults: The influence of family processes and acculturation

Sunshine M. Rote, Robyn Lewis Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examines the influence of family processes and acculturation for gender differences in alcohol and drug use among a sample representative of the Hispanic population in Miami-Dade County, Florida (N = 734). We found that (a) increases in age at marriage and acculturation were associated with greater substance use, (b) the associations between age at marriage, acculturation, and substance use were found to be greater for Hispanic women than men, and (c) with each additional child born, Hispanic women are increasingly less likely to use substances than Hispanic men. Data reveal that family processes and acculturation jointly impact substance use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-364
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Addictive Diseases
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by grants R01DA13292 and R01DA16429 from The National Institute on Drug Abuse and grant T32AG00270 from the National Institute on Aging. Address correspondence to Sunshine M. Rote, PhD, Sealy Center on Aging, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555. E-mail: surote@utmb.edu

Keywords

  • Substance use
  • acculturation
  • ethnicity
  • family processes
  • gender
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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