Gender Differences in Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs About Heart Disease

Lynne A. Jensen, Debra K. Moser

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to review the literature on gender differences in knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about heart disease. Despite the significant problem of cardiac disease among women, surveys of women's knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about the risks of heart disease have continually identified substantial gaps in women's knowledge. Overall, knowledge of heart disease, identification of risk factors for coronary artery disease, signs and symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was poor for both men and women. The perception that women are less knowledgeable than men about heart disease was not consistent in the literature reviewed. In fact, in some studies, women were more knowledgeable than men in the identification of risk factors and less common symptoms of AMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-104
Number of pages28
JournalNursing Clinics of North America
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing (all)

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