Gender differences in the processes linking public stigma and self-disclosure among college students with mental illness

Robyn Lewis Brown, Mairead Eastin Moloney, Jordan Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated predictors of self-disclosure among college students with mental illness. Participants were 1,393 current college students with a mental illness at 5 universities. Moderated mediation tests were used to analyze the data. Findings of the analysis reveal that public stigma is associated with mental illness disclosure among college students in part because it is associated with an increased perceived stress burden, particularly among men. Implications for future research and program development are discussed, with an emphasis on how public stigma and gender ideologies inform students’ decisions to acknowledge and address a mental health problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-212
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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