Glucose uptake and catabolite repression in dominant HTR1 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

S. Ozcan, K. Freidel, A. Leuker, M. Ciriacy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Growth and carbon metabolism in triosephosphate isomerase (Δtpi1) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are severely inhibited by glucose. By using this feature, we selected for secondary site revertants on glucose. We defined five complementation groups, some of which have previously been identified as glucose repression mutants. The predominant mutant type, HTR1 (hexose transport regulation), is dominant and causes various glucose-specific metabolic and regulatory defects in TPII wild-type cells. HTR1 mutants are deficient in high-affinity glucose uptake and have reduced low-affinity transport. Transcription of various known glucose transporter genes (HXT1, HXT3, and HXT4) was defective in HTR1 mutants, leading us to suggest that HTR mutations affect a negative factor of HXT gene expression. By contrast, transcript levels for SNF3, which encodes a component of high-affinity glucose uptake, were unaffected. We presume that HTR1 mutations affect a negative factor of HXT gene expression. Multicopy expression of HXT genes or parts of their regulatory sequences suppresses the metabolic defects of HTR1 mutants but not their derepressed phenotype at high glucose concentrations. This suggests that the glucose repression defect is not a direct result of the metabolically relevant defect in glucose transport. Alternatively, some unidentified regulatory components of the glucose transport system may be involved in the generation or transmission of signals for glucose repression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5520-5528
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Bacteriology
Volume175
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

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