Gluteal compartment syndrome and sciatica after bone marrow biopsy: A case report and review of the literature

John Scott Roth, Edwin C. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The gluteal region is not commonly thought of as a compartment, yet nondistensible osseofascial boundaries do exist. As with any case of compartment syndrome expedient therapeutic measures are critical to salvaging neuromuscular function. The gluteal compartment is unique, however, because of its tremendous muscle mass and great potential for producing devastating systemic sequelae. Gluteal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with unconscious patients who are recumbent for prolonged periods, but trauma, spontaneous bleeding, and overexertion can also cause it. We present a case report of gluteal compartment syndrome after bone marrow biopsy of the iliac crest. Recognizing gluteal compartment syndrome as an entity and maintaining a high index of suspicion for its development especially in unconscious patients can avert disaster regardless of etiology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)791-794
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume68
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gluteal compartment syndrome and sciatica after bone marrow biopsy: A case report and review of the literature'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this