Grafted dopamine neurons: Morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology

Ingrid Strömberg, Paula Bickford, Greg A. Gerhardt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Grafting of dopamine-rich tissue to counteract the symptoms in Parkinson's disease became a promising tool for future treatment. This article discusses how to improve the functional outcome with respect to graft outgrowth and functions of dopamine release and electrophysiological responses to graft implantation in the host brain striatal target. It has been documented that a subpopulation of the dopamine neurons innervates the host brain in a target-specific manner, while some of the grafted dopamine neurons never project to the host striatum. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that the graft-induced outgrowth synthesize, store, metabolize and release dopamine and possibly other neurotransmitters such as 5-HT. Furthermore, the released dopamine affects the dopamine-depleted brain in areas that are larger than the graft-derived nerve fibers reach. While stem cells will most likely be the future source of cells to be used in grafting, it is important to find the guiding cues for how to reinnervate the dopamine-depleted striatum in a proper way with respect to the dopamine subpopulations of A9 and A10 to efficiently treat the motor abnormalities seen in Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-197
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in Neurobiology
Volume90
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2010

Keywords

  • Dopamine
  • Electrophysiology
  • Neurochemistry
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (all)

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