Ground-motion site effect in the Beijing metropolitan area

Yanju Peng, Zhenming Wang, Edward W. Woolery, Yuejun Lyu, N. Seth Carpenter, Yi Fang, Shuai Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the past 500 years, many moderate to strong earthquakes have occurred in or near the Beijing metropolitan area, which is underlain by thick Quaternary and Tertiary sediments. Therefore, the area is susceptible to damage associated with ground-motion site effect, particularly for the large number of high-rise buildings. In order to understand the earthquake site effect potential, particularly in the context of the high-rise buildings, we are undertaking an effort to construct a 3-D shear-velocity model of the Quaternary and Tertiary sediments for the Beijing metropolitan area. In this paper, we present an integrated method of deriving shear-wave velocity profiles at sites across the Beijing metropolitan area using shear-wave velocity and ambient-noise measurements. Our results demonstrate that this method is practical for obtaining shear-wave velocity profiles. We performed 1-D site response analyses at six sites in the Beijing metropolitan area. The results show that the site resonant periods vary between 0.1 s at shallow sites in the west and 4.0 s for deep sites in the east. Moreover, this range of resonant periods coincides with the fundamental periods of many buildings between one to 40 stories. In other words, earthquake site effect could generate a double resonance in a significant number of buildings in the Beijing area. Results also show that the average shear-wave velocity of the top 20 or 30 m, Vs20 or Vs30, does not correlate with site resonance, and is therefore not an appropriate parameter to account for site effect in earthquake engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105395
JournalEngineering Geology
Volume266
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 5 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research is partially funded by a grant from the Institute of Crustal Dynamics, China Earthquake Administration (No. ZDJ2017-28) and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFC1500403). The epicenters and magnitudes in Fig. 1 are from the China Earthquake Data Center (http://data.earthquake.cn/sjfw; last accessed December 2018). We appreciated Chen et al. for allowing us to use the microtremor data, and Weijun Wang of the Institute of Earthquake Forecasting, China Earthquake Administration, for providing the data. The process of ambient noise data was carried out using GEOSPY (http://www.geopsy.org/download.php; last accessed December 2018). We appreciated the anonymous reviewers for their constructive comments and suggestions that have helped to greatly improve this manuscript. We thanked Meg Smath of the Kentucky Geological Survey for editorial help.

Funding Information:
This research is partially funded by a grant from the Institute of Crustal Dynamics, China Earthquake Administration (No. ZDJ2017-28 ) and the National Key Research and Development Program of China ( 2017YFC1500403 ). The epicenters and magnitudes in Fig. 1 are from the China Earthquake Data Center ( http://data.earthquake.cn/sjfw; last accessed December 2018). We appreciated Chen et al. for allowing us to use the microtremor data, and Weijun Wang of the Institute of Earthquake Forecasting, China Earthquake Administration, for providing the data. The process of ambient noise data was carried out using GEOSPY ( http://www.geopsy.org/download.php; last accessed December 2018). We appreciated the anonymous reviewers for their constructive comments and suggestions that have helped to greatly improve this manuscript. We thanked Meg Smath of the Kentucky Geological Survey for editorial help.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The Authors

Keywords

  • High-rise buildings
  • Predominant site period
  • Site effect
  • Strong ground motion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Geology

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