Hemodynamic and echocardiographic profiles in african american compared with white offspring of hypertensive parents: The HyperGEN study

Stephen P. Glasser, Amy I. Lynch, Richard B. Devereux, Paul Hopkins, Donna K. Arnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Alterations in cardiovascular structure and function have been shown to precede the finding of elevated blood pressure. methods This study is part of the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiologic Network (HyperGEN) in which genetic and environmental determinants of hypertension were investigated in 5 geographical field centers. All nonhypertensive offspring (n = 1,035) were included from the entire HyperGEN study population that consists of 2,225 hypertensive patients and 1,380 nonhypertensive patients who had adequate echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) mass measurements. Participants were compared by self-declared race (African American and white). results Nonhypertensive African American offspring were younger (aged 31 years vs. 38 years), more likely to be female, and had a higher body mass index (BMI) and higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) than their white counterparts. After adjusting for age, sex, SBP, pulse pressure (PP), BMI, diabetes status, and family effects, we observed statistically significant and potentially pathophysiological differences (all with P = 0.001) with greater LV mass/height, relative wall thickness, and posterior wall thickness and with lesser midwall shortening, PP/stroke volume, and (PP/stroke volume)/fat-free body mass. conclusion This study shows that ethnic differences in hemodynamic and echocardiographic profiles exist in a large, population-based cohort of nonhypertensive offspring of hypertensive parents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-26
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study is part of HyperGEN in which genetic and environmental determinants of hypertension were investigated in the following 5 geographical field centers: Forsyth County, NC; Minneapolis, MN; Framingham, MA; Salt Lake City, UT; and Birmingham, AL. Detailed information on the HyperGEN study design and recruitment strategy is provided elsewhere.10,11 Briefly, the HyperGEN study is a component of the Family Blood Pressure Program, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to assess the genetic contribution to hypertension in population-based samples. It is a family study based on a sib-pair design that recruited hypertensive members of sibships in which ≥2 siblings had onset of hypertension without known cause by age 60 years, were willing to enroll, and had at least 1 additional hypertensive sibling who could be enrolled in the study. Institutional review boards at each participating institution approved the research protocols, and all participants provided informed consent.

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Echocardiography hypertensive offspring
  • HyperGEN
  • Hypertension
  • Left ventricular mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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