Hepatic Steatosis is Associated with an Increased Risk of Postoperative Infections and Perioperative Transfusion Requirements in Patients Undergoing Hepatectomy

Diego Villagomez, Malay Shah, Francesc Marti, Gabriel Orozco, Daniel Davenport, Meera Gupta, Alexandre Ancheta, Siddharth Desai, Gabriel Vilchez, Joseph Zwischenberger, Roberto Gedaly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: To determine the impact of hepatic steatosis on perioperative outcomes of patients undergoing hepatectomy. Methods: We analyzed all hepatectomy patients with normal and fatty liver texture, between 2014 and 2018 using NSQIP. Main endpoints included perioperative transfusions (within 72 h) and infectious complications. Results: A total of 8,237 patients underwent hepatectomy during the study period. The overall rate of fatty liver texture (FLG) was 31% (2,557). Operative duration was significantly longer; inflow occlusion was more common (Pringle maneuver), and the need of transfusions was significantly higher in the FLG compared to the normal liver group (NLG) (p = < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, patients in the FLG had increased risk of developing infectious complications (OR 1.22 [95%IC 1.05–1.41]) and transfusion requirements within 72 h after hepatectomy (OR 1.43 [95% CI 1.24–1.63]). Conclusions: Hepatic steatosis is an independent risk factor for the development of infectious complications and increased perioperative transfusion requirements in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Those requiring transfusions within 72 h had also an increased risk of infections after hepatectomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3654-3659
Number of pages6
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume45
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, Société Internationale de Chirurgie.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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