Home Radon Testing in Rural Appalachia

Stacy R. Stanifer, Mary Kay Rayens, Amanda Wiggins, David Gross, Ellen J. Hahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study compared differences in sociodemographic characteristics, personal risk perception of lung cancer, lung cancer worry, and synergistic risk perception among rural Appalachia residents who completed home radon testing with those who did not, after receiving a free long-term test kit at a rural primary care clinic. The study also examined the association between the Teachable Moment Model constructs and home radon testing. Methods: The study was an exploratory correlational design with a convenience sample of (N = 58) adult participants recruited from 2 rural primary care clinics in Appalachia Kentucky. Participants completed a brief survey and were given a free long-term home radon test kit. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine characteristics associated with home radon testing. Findings: Twenty-eight participants (48%) completed home radon testing. There were no differences in personal risk perception of lung cancer, lung cancer worry, or synergistic risk perception between those who completed home radon testing and those who did not. Age was the only significant factor associated with completion of radon testing (B = 0.077, P =.005). For every 5-year increase in age, participants were 47% more likely to test their home for radon. Conclusion: Providing free home radon test kits in the primary care setting shows promise in prompting radon testing in rural Appalachia. As radon-induced lung cancer risk increases with exposure over time, health care providers in rural Appalachia need to encourage patients of all ages to test their home for radon, especially those who smoke or report smoking in the home.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-261
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Rural Health
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
: This publication was supported, in part, by UK‐CARES through Grant P30 ES026529. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Funding

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank St. Claire HealthCare and the Northeast Area Health Education Center for partnering on this project. This publication was supported, in part, by UK-CARES through Grant P30 ES026529. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 National Rural Health Association

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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