Hormone-responsive organoids from domestic mare and endangered Przewalski’s horse endometrium

Riley E. Thompson, Aime K. Johnson, Pouya Dini, Margherita Y. Turco, Tulio M. Prado, Christopher Premanandan, Graham J. Burton, Barry A. Ball, Brian K. Whitlock, Budhan S. Pukazhenthi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The endometrium, the inner uterine lining, is composed of cell layers that come in direct contact with an embryo during early pregnancy and later with the fetal placenta. The endometrium is responsible for signals associated with normal reproductive cyclicity as well as maintenance of pregnancy. In the mare, functionally competent in vitro models of the endometrium have not been successful. Furthermore, the ability to study various reproductive processes in vitro may allow critical evaluation of signaling pathways involved in the reproductive diseases of animals that cannot be handled frequently, such as various wildlife species. Here we report the establishment of organoids, 3D structures, derived from fresh and frozen–thawed equine endometrium (Equus ferus caballus and E. f. przewalskii). Although organoids from domestic mares responded to exogenous hormonal stimuli, organoids from Przewalski’s horse failed to respond to exogenous hormones. The present study represents a ‘first’ for any large animal model or endangered species. These physiologically functional organoids may facilitate improved understanding of normal reproductive mechanisms, uterine pathologies, and signaling mechanisms between the conceptus and endometrium and may lead to the development of novel bioassays for drug discovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)819-831
Number of pages13
JournalReproduction
Volume160
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Society for Reproduction and Fertility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Embryology
  • Endocrinology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Hormone-responsive organoids from domestic mare and endangered Przewalski’s horse endometrium'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this