How adolescents’ popularity perceptions change: Measuring interactions between popularity and friendship networks

Ana Bravo, Robert W. Krause, Rosario Ortega-Ruiz, Eva M. Romera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Longitudinal multivariate social network analysis (N=3692 adolescents; 136 classrooms) showed that adolescents were more likely to perceive their friends as popular but did not choose peers that they perceived to be popular as friends. Adolescents aligned their perceptions of popularity with their friends. Adolescents who received many popularity nominations attracted more popularity but not more friendship. Friends of peers seen as popular by an individual were more likely to be seen as popular by that individual. These results highlight the importance of describing popularity as a network, exploring dyadic, triadic, and group processes separately.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-24
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Networks
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Friendship
  • Longitudinal multivariate analysis
  • Popularity
  • SienaBayes
  • Social network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • General Social Sciences
  • General Psychology

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