How Does Green Dot Bystander Training in High School and Beyond Impact Attitudes Toward Violence and Sexism in a Prospective Cohort?

Ann L. Coker, Heather M. Bush, Zhengyan Huang, Candace J. Brancato, Emily R. Clear, Diane R. Follingstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bystander interventions are recognized as “promising” programming to reduce sexual violence. Gaps in current evaluations include limited follow-up post-training (beyond 24 months) and knowledge of additional bystander training during follow-up. In this prospective cohort study, nested in a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT), three cohorts of high school (HS) seniors were recruited (Fall 2013-2015) and followed through Spring 2018 (n = 1,831). Training was based on their school cluster RCT assignment and receipt of additional Green Dot (GD) training after HS. Training was hypothesized to be associated with lower scores indicating less acceptance of violence or sexism. Sixty percent reported GD training after HS (68.7% of 986 in intervention and 50% of 845 in control conditions). No significant differences (p <.05) were observed by GD training for four of the five violence acceptance or sexism attitudinal measures at recruitment or final surveys. For “ambivalent sexism” alone was there a significant reduction in scale scores over time in the intervention versus control condition. Additional GD training after the RCT significantly reduced neither violence acceptance nor sexism scores over time. GD training does not appear to have a consistent longer-term impact on reducing violence acceptance and sexism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)NP13830-NP13853
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume37
Issue number15-16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 SAGE Publications.

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • domestic violence
  • intervention
  • intervention/treatment
  • sexual assault
  • sexual harassment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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