Identifying Issues and Concerns With the Use of Interval-Based Systems in Single Case Research Using a Pilot Simulation Study

Jennifer R. Ledford, Kevin M. Ayres, Justin D. Lane, Man Fung Lam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Momentary time sampling (MTS), whole interval recording (WIR), and partial interval recording (PIR) are commonly used in applied research. We discuss potential difficulties with analyzing data when these systems are used and present results from a pilot simulation study designed to determine the extent to which these issues are likely to be problematic in the context of single case design studies. Results indicate that WIR and PIR may result in invalid effect size estimations. Although MTS more closely paralleled actual duration, it may induce variability in relatively short sessions, increasing the likelihood of Type II errors. Suggestions for practitioners, consumers, and researchers include careful use and reporting of data collected using interval-based systems and continued investigation of properties of these systems, particularly on the effects on effect size estimations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-117
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Special Education
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2015.

Keywords

  • interval recording
  • momentary time sampling
  • single case

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation

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