“If Their Face Starts Turning Purple, You Are Probably Doing Something Wrong”: Young Men’s Experiences with Choking During Sex

Debby Herbenick, Lucia Guerra-Reyes, Callie Patterson, Yael R. Rosenstock Gonzalez, Caroline Wagner, Nelson O.O. Zounlome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Choking/strangulation during sex has become prevalent in the United States. Yet, no qualitative research has addressed men’s choking experiences. Through interviews with 21 young adult men, we examined the language men use to refer to choking, how they first learned about it, their experiences with choking, and consent and safety practices. Men learned about choking during adolescence from pornography, partners, friends, and mainstream media. They engaged in choking to be kinky, adventurous, and to please partners. While many enjoyed or felt neutral about choking, others were reluctant to choke or be choked. Safety and verbal/non-verbal consent practices varied widely.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)502-519
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Sex and Marital Therapy
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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