In-hospital illicit drug use, substance use disorders, and acceptance of residential treatment in a prospective pilot needs assessment of hospitalized adults with severe infections from injecting drugs

Laura C. Fanucchi, Michelle R. Lofwall, Paul A. Nuzzo, Sharon L. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To conduct a pilot needs assessment of underlying substance use disorders (SUD), motivation for SUD treatment, and willingness to enter residential SUD treatment in hospitalized adults who inject drugs with complex infections requiring intravenous (IV) antibiotics, and to assess the presence of in-hospital illicit substance use. Patients and methods: From March 8, 2016 through August 25, 2016 hospitalized, English-speaking, adult patients not currently in SUD treatment with a history of injection drug use and a current infection requiring treatment with IV antibiotics, were prospectively enrolled. Participants were followed weekly during the hospitalization and for 60 days after discharge via interview and medical record review. Results: Of the 42 participants, 8 (19.0%) accepted discharge to residential SUD treatment, 16 (38.0%) completed at least one follow-up research visit after hospital discharge, and 3 (7.1%) died during the 5-month study period. The majority (33; 78%) were hospitalized with endocarditis, and 37 (88.0%) had an opioid use disorder (DSM-5). Mean days of self-reported IV opioid use in the 30 days before hospitalization compared to 30 days after discharge decreased significantly (16.5 to 1.5, P =.001) despite not receiving SUD treatment. Illicit in-hospital drug use was identified in 17 (40.5%) participants, with opioids most commonly detected. Conclusion: Hospitalization is a ‘reachable moment’ and critical opportunity to initiate evidence-based treatment for opioid use disorder. The ongoing in-hospital illicit drug use and high short-term mortality observed in this study contribute to the mandate to expand access to effective pharmacotherapy for opioid use disorder and integrate it into health care settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-69
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume92
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018

Keywords

  • Endocarditis
  • Injection drug use
  • Substance use disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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