In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions

Maria S. Zeuss, Craig S. Miller, Dean K. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

83 Scopus citations

Abstract

Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p < 0.005), chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes of HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)714-720
Number of pages7
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1991

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported in part by a grant from the University of Kentucky Medical Center Research Fund. aAssociate Professor, Departamento de Atencian Odontologica Integral al Adulta (Patologia Bucal), Facultad de Odontologia, Uni-versidad de Carabobo, Valencia. bAssistant Professor, Department of Oral Health Science, Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine Section, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington. cPrafessor, Department of Oral Health Science, Oral Pathology Section, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington. l/14/29763

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • General Dentistry

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