In vivo protection by the xanthate tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate against amyloid β-peptide (1-42)-induced oxidative stress

M. Perluigi, G. Joshi, R. Sultana, V. Calabrese, C. De Marco, R. Coccia, D. A. Butterfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Considerable evidence supports the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. One hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of amyloid β-peptide, which invokes a cascade of oxidative damage to neurons that can eventually result in neuronal death. Amyloid β-peptide is the main component of senile plaques and generates free radicals ultimately leading to neuronal damage of membrane lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, interest in the protective role of different antioxidant compounds has been growing for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other oxidative stress-related disorders. Among different antioxidant drugs, much interest has been devoted to "thiol-delivering" compounds. Tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate is an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine specific phospholipase C, and recent studies reported its ability to act as a glutathione-mimetic compound. In the present study, we investigate the in vivo ability of tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate to protect synaptosomes against amyloid β-peptide-induced oxidative stress. Gerbils were injected i.p. with tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate or with saline solution, and synaptosomes were isolated from the brain. Synaptosomal preparations isolated from tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate injected gerbils and treated ex vivo with amyloid β-peptide (1-42) showed a significant decrease of oxidative stress parameters: reactive oxygen species levels, protein oxidation (protein carbonyl and 3-nitrotyrosine levels) and lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels). Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that modulation of free radicals generated by amyloid β-peptide might represent an efficient therapeutic strategy for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other oxidative-stress related disorders. Based on the above data, we suggest that tricyclodecan-9-yl- xanthogenate is a potent antioxidant and could be of importance for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other oxidative stress-related disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1161-1170
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by grants from NIH to D.A.B. [AG-10836; AG-05119]. The time spent by Dr. Marzia Perluigi in Prof. Butterfield’s laboratory has been supported by a post-doc grant of the University of Rome “La Sapienza.”

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid β-peptide
  • Antioxidant
  • D609
  • Glutathione
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience

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