Incorporating dynamic crop growth processes and management practices into a terrestrial biosphere model for simulating crop production in the United States: Toward a unified modeling framework

Yongfa You, Hanqin Tian, Shufen Pan, Hao Shi, Zihao Bian, Angelo Gurgel, Yawen Huang, David Kicklighter, Xin Zhong Liang, Chaoqun Lu, Jerry Melillo, Ruiqing Miao, Naiqing Pan, John Reilly, Wei Ren, Rongting Xu, Jia Yang, Qiang Yu, Jingting Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Agricultural decision-making by different interest groups (e.g., farmers, development agents and policy makers) usually takes place on different scales (e.g., plot, landscape and country). Currently, tools to assist decision-making are either dedicated to small-scale management guidance or large-scale assessment, which ignore the cross-scale linkages and interactions and thus may not provide robust and consistent guidance and assessment. Here, we developed an advanced agricultural modeling framework by integrating the strengths of conventional crop models in representing crop growth processes and management practices into a terrestrial biosphere model (TBM), the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM), to meet the cross-scale application needs (e.g., adaptation and mitigation). Specifically, dynamic crop growth processes, including crop-specific phenological development, carbon allocation, yield formation, biological nitrogen fixation processes, and management practices such as tillage, cover cropping and genetic improvements, were explicitly represented in DLEM. The new model was evaluated against site-scale observations and the results showed that the model performed generally well, with an average normalized root mean square error of 19.91% for leaf area index and 17.46% for aboveground biomass at the seasonal scale and 14.42% for annual yield. Then the model was applied to simulate corn, soybean, and winter wheat productions in the conterminous United States from 1960 to 2018. The spatial patterns of simulated crop productions were consistent with ground survey data. Our model also captured both the long-term trends and interannual variations of the total national productions of the three crops. This study demonstrates the significance of fusing conventional crop modeling techniques into TBMs to establish a unified modeling framework, which holds the potential to address climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation across varied spatiotemporal scales.

Original languageEnglish
Article number109144
JournalAgricultural and Forest Meteorology
Volume325
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Crop growth
  • Cross-scale
  • Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model
  • Management practice
  • Yield

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Atmospheric Science

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